Blog Archives

A New Rainwater Harvesting System Online on the Westside

Hello all! Once again I can’t say much because the pics speak for themselves. I just did a one day install at the home of Chris Toussaint, LA Westside permaculturist and filmmaker, said install consisting of a vinyl downspouts leading inexorably and leak-free(!) to a rain harvesting barrel provided by Sustainable Works in the City of Santa Monica… my second rainwater harvesting system. I got to see firsthand the lessons I learned from the Sugar Shack install working beautifully here, and I must say I left the work site ready to celebrate, pumping the tunes loud and hard in the hump-day traffic toward home.

As you can see in the little photo-diagram below, in the initial consultation we discussed a number of actions for optimizing passive water use on the property. Wednesday afternoon, the downspout went up beautifully; the rest may come later.

The celebratory mood came not only from the seamless installation, or from the fact that I have gained more wisdom to offer in the upcoming e-book, or from the new information we will gain from this install as it functions in months and years to come. It came also in  the recognition that this little 55-gallon system is another tiny but definitive step in the direction of freedom for all of us; after all, if everyone in LA put up a little system like this, it might be enough to give our aqueducts and maybe the Sacramento Delta or the Colorado River enough time off to regenerate the abundance they can provide for all of us.

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Thank you Chris for creating the opportunity and caring for people and planet. And thank you all for listening. I hope I’ve inspired you.

Toward a culture of abundance, ho!

Sugar Shack’s Rain Collection System Captures Beautifully in its First Rain

Well it’s always a little nerve-wracking when finally cutting the ribbon on a new project, no matter how much you’ve tested it. Even though I dropped a few 15 gallon buckets of water down the chute from the Sugar Shack’s rooftop to test the rainwater catchment system after I finished the build, and even though I added an extra bead of silicone caulk to those pesky corner-rounding spots in the rain gutters, there was still that nagging sense of… what if?

No more. We got our first storm in the neighborhood yesterday, a few solid hours of rain in the afternoon, and I couldn’t wait until the sun popped out to find out how the system was doing. The inflows were dropping a heavy flow into the barrels and doing just fine. After the rains had passed our four barrels were about half full, about 110 gallons caught.

Now I can  get a more accurate idea of how much water we can catch: I went to www.noaa.gov and typed in our zip code. The nearest weather station to us is on the USC campus, which is a few miles away, but it’s close enough to give an idea of how much rain we got. The USC station got about 0.16 inches of rain during the storm; an average LA rain year of 15 inches would fill our barrels almost 50 times, though most of that will occur over the course of an entire six month “wet” season, and anything over 0.3 inches at once will be lost to the overflow.

It’s a good thing then that I actually improved the garden drainage by shunting the overflow directly into the drainage pipe, and there’s ample opportunity (and barrels around the garden) to do a rooftop catchment as well.