Blog Archives

Refinement to the Hanging Garden for Fast & Easy Installation

Today I proved a refinement concept to the Hanging Garden, and was so excited to see a five-level prototype (ceiling to floor, baby!) that I was tempted to drop all the other stuff I have to do this weekend in favor of a fat dinner and a movie, lol! The main change, the knot-&-keyhole connector system means that anyone can now assemble a Hanging Garden in just a couple of hours and will need only a decent drill to put the ceiling mount in place. These photos show the simplified version made out of reclaimed MDF I put together just to test the improvements.

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There’s more to come as I will soon be installing two of these beauties, one in an urban loft for an in-house herb-garden, and one outdoors in a Venice community garden.

As I mentioned in my last post about the Hanging Garden, I’m taking orders in California. I’ll build you a five-level hanging garden with integrated planter boxes on each level as shown in the original post for $500 and the right to capture some photos over the next few years. For a different number of levels and for customization, the price varies. Until I have a Vertecology online store up and running, just call me at 818.538.6586 or send me an email at markscottlavin-at-gmail-dot-com with “Hanging Garden” in the subject line. Thanks & happy Halloween everybody!

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The Hanging Garden Proof of Concept… and Now Taking Orders

I’ve been dreaming of an ultra-eco, hyperversatile hanging garden system for the modern age, one where multiple useful species can grow together for maximum effect in a three-dimensional ecosystem. In fact, I’m dreaming no more. Here are some computer model screenshots and the proof of concept.

Already the product is exceeding expectations; one will note the extreme rigidity and stability of the system, which shocked me as well as pretty much everyone here at the Sugar Shack. First it was just about feeling the uncanny rigidity when you’d try to swing the structure, but as of about 10 pm tonight, the system also successfully passed a 200 lb weight test with barely a creak. Apparently that’s just the magic of triangles, which R. Buckminster Fuller noted as the most stable shape in the universe.

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And it doesn’t have to be just a garden structure. Shelves, cat-houses, bird-feeders, bat habitats, even elevated fish ponds and combinations of all the above have been suggested in the last few days. You can hang ‘em from the patio, from the ceiling joists, from a tree, from a bridge, from a utility pole (guerilla gardening in the concrete jungle anyone?), and you can build a wall of them on the farm or your 30th floor balcony.

It’s all just rope, reclaimed wood and reclaimed plastic lining, except for the three hardware mounts, and I intend to keep it that way. At the very least I’ll be using exclusively Forest Stewardship Council certified wood and reclaimed/recycled if you want other materials like plexi. I’m now refining the connector system so that it will be easy for anyone to assemble in half an hour. Once I’ve determined how to manufacture the components quickly, cheaply and in a way that empowers people, communities and planet (I’m quickly learning that this will be an on-going process of refinement) the plans, CNC files if applicable and kits will become available here at Vertecology.com and possibly through other vendors.

For now I’m taking orders if you’re in California and want a Hanging Garden. I’ll be happy to build you a five-level hanging garden as shown in the computer graphics here (2 feet wide by about 8-1/2 tall) and install it for $500 and the right to capture some photos over the next few years. For a different number of levels and for customization, the price will vary. Until I have a Vertecology online store up and running you can just call me at 818.538.6586 or send me an email at markscottlavin-at-gmail-dot-com with “Hanging Garden” in the subject line.

Prototype “Truss Table” and “Octet” Make an Appearance at the California Gift Show

Well there’s nothing growing on them (yet… stay tuned…) but this table and octahedron, built of entirely reclaimed materials made an appearance this weekend at the California Gift Show as part of the booth for Looptworks, a Portland, Oregon based startup that has recently been featured in Fast Company and Entrepreneur magazines (Click on the links for the articles). Looptworks specializes in limited runs of stylish clothing and other accessories such as iPad and laptop bags made from “upcycled” materials – scrap fabrics that would otherwise be thrown away by textile manufacturers.

As the photos attest we also included displays for their presentation that were entirely improvised from scrap palettes and plywood dumped in a Midtown LA parking lot – it’s amazing what a bit of paint and style can do. After a hump-day all-nighter building the table I met up with Scott Hamlin and Kiana Neal, who commissioned the design and flew down to represent Looptworks at the Gift Show. We then spent most of a tired but fun Thursday installing at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

The table and octahedron are entirely modular. The table is constructed from a single repeating wooden form that can be modified slightly with each iteration and positioned either to become part of the top or one of the side supports, and that when put together form a solid truss.

The frame was made from reclaimed Douglas Fir 2×4’s that were originally used by a photographer friend for another display, and we decided to leave a few traces of the text she painted on the wood for a little taste of the materials’ history and a stylish flair further enhanced by artful cuts and gaps on the plywood and scrap corrugated plastic tabletop.

The octahedron, also of reclaimed Douglas Fir mostly purchased from Jose Nunez & Son scrap yard in East LA (2×4’s for $1 a piece if you’re willing to pull the nails), is also part of a repeating system, one that can be adapted as a multifunctional garden system – individual octahedron/tetrahedron elements such as this one can be stacked, bolted together, individual units being left open, partially or wholly enclosed, with each unit taking on one or more ecological x structural x happy-people functions, pretty much limited only by imagination. Check the photo below.

All in all a great weekend and I look forward to working with Looptworks again in the near future; we are already planning on another show in October

You can see more photos including process shots on my facebook profile photo album. And do, if you get the chance, click on the link above for Douglas Fir – it helps us all to know where the materials originally originated. These trees can grow to 393 feet. I was quite amazed to learn 🙂